In this discipline, one of the processes that professionals face the most is that of dental restoration, which consists, in short, of totally or partially reconstructing a tooth or a set of teeth in patients due to fracture, irreversible condition caused by trauma, caries, or due to wear.

How Does It Work?

With dental restoration, what is achieved is to make the teeth stronger, restoring as far as possible their anatomical shape so that they recover their function and also gain in aesthetics. The key is to replace the damaged or lost tissues with the help of artificial materials that are harmless to the body.

What Are The Most Common Dental Restorations?

  • Inlays: Inserting small esthetic pieces made of materials such as porcelain, resin, or different metals, which replace missing parts of the teeth.
  • Veneers: Also known as laminate veneers. They are generally made of porcelain and are applied to the front teeth to cover some imperfections in the dentition, such as defects in the enamel, worn, pigmented, or discolored pieces.
  • Crowns: These are the most common dental restorations. They are used in situations where it is necessary to completely replace the tooth or at least a significant proportion. They are custom-made pieces that simulate the tooth’s anatomy and are placed on the tooth, acting as a fastening element.
  • Filling: It is a process that consists of introducing a soft material that hardens and adapts until it covers the gap allowed by the tooth.

When Are Dental Restorations Necessary?

The answer to this question is quite simple when there is loss or wear of a dental piece. However, when the damage is already visible, waiting until that moment can be a mistake because the reconstruction process is more complicated and expensive.

Regular visits to the dentist are also aimed at detecting this damage in time. Caries, tooth wear, or bruxism processes are the usual causes that force these problems. Thus, when we feel persistent and intense pain in the teeth, we must go immediately to the dentist in order to act in a preventive manner.

When Is Restoration Not Indicated?

  • Teeth with deep caries or that already contaminated the pulp.
  • Teeth with lesions such as granuloma or root cyst.
  • Teeth that will lose many tooth tissue, and the restoration would be larger than what is left of the original tooth.
  • Teeth with gingival problems that may compromise the integration of the restoration with the tooth.

Suppose you have any questions about caries or have any doubts about this procedure at Avenue Sourire. In that case, we can always give you a general consultation, and you can schedule an appointment no matter if you are a new patient.